Jeremy L. Mohler

my writing > jeremymohler.org

Sep 30
Jam of the day
one of the best

Jam of the day

one of the best


Sep 18
today’s jam

today’s jam


Sep 12

Henceforth, my dear philosophers, let us be on guard against the dangerous old conceptual fiction that posited a “pure, will-less, painless, timeless knowing subject” [which] demand[s] that we should think of an eye that is completely unthinkable, an eye turned in no particular direction, in which the active and interpreting forces, through which alone seeing becomes seeing something, are supposed to be lacking…. There is only a perspective seeing, only a perspective “knowing”; and the more affects we allow to speak about one thing, the more eyes, different eyes, we can use to observe one thing, the more complete will our “concept” of this thing, our “objectivity,” be.

NietzcheOn the Genealogy of Morals

One of the soundest arguments for direct democracy…


Sep 10
come out to the opening on Thursday Sept 26 @ 6pm to hang out

come out to the opening on Thursday Sept 26 @ 6pm to hang out


Sep 9
GO SEE MARISSA’S WORK!!!
On View: September 13 - October 19, 2013Opening Reception: Friday, September 13, 7-9pm  
In her first solo exhibition, Marissa Long presents still-life assemblage photography that is both seductive and grotesque. According to the artist, “These photographs combine organic matter, food, household items, and animal parts into pile-like identities. Simultaneously whimsical and dark, the forms speak to bodily existence and its remains; desire, revulsion, and the banal made sacrosanct through the act of display.”
Beautiful and disturbing, the work speaks to the human condition and contributes to a dialogue about what can be new, or renewed, in the world of fine-art photography. With her careful constructions and expert lighting and printing, Long joins the ranks of the classically trained still-life photographer; her work refreshes the canon with new approaches to visual questions about life, death, and the nature of existence.
Marissa Long is a DC-based artist who studied photography at the Corcoran College of Art + Design. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally, and is held in various private collections.

GO SEE MARISSA’S WORK!!!

On View: September 13 - October 19, 2013
Opening Reception: Friday, September 13, 7-9pm

In her first solo exhibition, Marissa Long presents still-life assemblage photography that is both seductive and grotesque. According to the artist, “These photographs combine organic matter, food, household items, and animal parts into pile-like identities. Simultaneously whimsical and dark, the forms speak to bodily existence and its remains; desire, revulsion, and the banal made sacrosanct through the act of display.”

Beautiful and disturbing, the work speaks to the human condition and contributes to a dialogue about what can be new, or renewed, in the world of fine-art photography. With her careful constructions and expert lighting and printing, Long joins the ranks of the classically trained still-life photographer; her work refreshes the canon with new approaches to visual questions about life, death, and the nature of existence.

Marissa Long is a DC-based artist who studied photography at the Corcoran College of Art + Design. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally, and is held in various private collections.


Sep 3
southern maryland - sept 2013

southern maryland - sept 2013


Aug 29
francis bacon
quickly becoming one of my favorite painters

francis bacon

quickly becoming one of my favorite painters


Aug 28
latest jam

latest jam


Aug 20

Aug 19

Short thought…

The general political tendency of the past three decades is that of nation-state governments directing their attention outward towards the elite business sectors of other nation-states as opposed to inward toward the populations that these governments supposedly represent. So in turn, capital has flowed in the same way.

There are in theory two reactions to this neoliberal tendency.

One is a reactionary, nationalist, right-wing reaction that yearns for a more “pure” past with racism and sexism being the primary expressions of this homogeneous movement. The Tea Party in the U.S. and Breivik in Norway are exemplars of this reaction.

The other reaction is a left-wing call for real globalization, that is, movements from the ground up that aren’t exclusive along lines of class, race, or gender, and that ignore nation-state boundaries just as capitalist globalization does. The Zapatistas and Occupy are expressions of this second reaction. In the face of being ignored by representative governments, and the increasing consolidation of global power into organizations like the WTO, and through agreements like NAFTA and the imminent TPP, this progressive response wants to decentralize power into groups of people who actually listen to each other in hopes of building communities with more expressive and moral human relationships.


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